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Ida Mae Astute/ABC(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump will not attend this year's White House Correspondents' Dinner, he announced on twitter Saturday.

"Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!" the commander-in-chief added.

The dinner, sponsored by the White House Correspondents' Association and attended by a mix of A-list celebrities and Washington media, generally includes a comedian roast, plus a humorous address by the president.

The WHCA responded that the group "takes note" that Trump won't attend the dinner, scheduled for April 29, and said the dinner "has been and will continue to be a celebration of the First Amendment and the important role played by an independent news media in a healthy republic."

Trump has been mocked in years past.

In 2011, headliner Seth Meyers skewered the billionaire, saying "Donald Trump has been saying he will run for president as a Republican, which is surprising because I just assumed that he was running as a joke."

"Donald Trump often appears on Fox, which is ironic because a fox often appears on Donald Trump's head," Meyers added.

That same year, President Obama also poked fun at the man who would later go on to succeed him in the White House: "Now, I know that he's taken some flak lately, but no one is happier, no one is prouder to put this birth certificate matter to rest than the Donald. And that's because he can finally get back to focusing on the issues that matter –- like, did we fake the moon landing? What really happened in Roswell? And where are Biggie and Tupac?"

At his last correspondents' dinner, in 2016, Obama took aim at then-candidate Trump, saying: "I'm a little hurt that he's not here tonight. It's surprising. You got a room full of reporters, celebrities, cameras, and he says no."

"I hope you all are proud of yourselves. The guy wanted to give his hotel business a boost and now we're praying that Cleveland makes it through July," Obama added, in reference to the site of the Republican National Convention last summer.

The dinner, affectionately dubbed "nerd prom," raises thousands for journalism scholarships and honors outstanding journalists.

According to the White House Correspondent's Association, every president since Calvin Coolidge, who first first attended in 1924, has been to the dinner at least once.

The news of Trump's expected absence comes as the president's relationship with the press grows increasingly tense. Trump has repeatedly slammed journalists for propagating "fake news" and has labeled several major outlets -- including ABC News -- "the enemy of the American People."

 

I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year. Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 25, 2017

 

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MANDEL NGAN,BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images(ATLANTA) -- Former Secretary of Labor Tom Perez has been elected the next chair of the Democratic National Committee, grabbing the reins of the political wing of the party and emerging as a key figure in the party's opposition to President Donald Trump's agenda.

More than 400 party insiders gathered in Atlanta this weekend to cast their ballots. The former Obama appointee will try to rally a party still reeling from its presidential election defeat and crippled by down-ballot losses across the country over the last decade.

Many in the party's progressive wing had thrown their support behind Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison, expressing their frustration with the status quo of the party. They felt strongly that Ellison better identified with the grassroots movement growing across the country in opposition to Trump.

Perez, who fell one ballot short shy of victory in the first round of voting, immediately appointed Ellison deputy chair of the DNC after it was announced that he had won.

"I need to tell you folks at the outset: I know that I have more questions than answers," Perez told the crowd in a victory speech, reaching out to those who opposed his bid. "As a team, we will work together.

"We should all be able to say ... the united Democratic Party led the resistance and ensured that this president would be a one-term president," he continued.

Ellison spoke of the need for the party to unify.

"I just want to say to you that if you came here supporting me ... I'm asking you to give everything you got to support Chairman Perez," Ellison said. "We don't have the luxury to walk out of this room divided."

Sen. Bernie Sanders, the former presidential candidate who had backed Ellison's bid, said he looks forward to working with Perez but insisted the party must change its direction.

 

It's imperative Tom understands that the same-old, same-old isn't working and that we must bring in working and young people in a new way.

— Bernie Sanders (@BernieSanders) February 25, 2017

 

"Ellison offered a chance to hit the ground running and immediately start building bridges between the DNC and the progressive activist base," said Adam Green of the Progressive Change Campaign Committee. "The burden will be on [Perez] to build the bridge."

After emails leaked last summer revealed former chair Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz had purportedly influenced the presidential primary, many activists who sided with Sen. Bernie Sanders were left feeling betrayed and disillusioned by the party establishment. Those leaks last summer forced Wasserman Schultz to step down.

Perez was backed by many from former President Obama's political orbit, including former Vice President Joe Biden, while Ellison garnered support from liberals like Sanders. But the lines are not hard and fast. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer also backed Ellison, while Perez had the support of some labor groups.

Larry Cohen, a long time union organizer who campaigned hard for Ellison promised, however, to stay actively involved in the formal party.

"We'll be here until we have a progressive populist party," he said.

Rep. Maxine Waters of California voted for Ellison, but said she was confident Perez would be able to bring people together.

Former DNC Chair Howard Dean had backed South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg, who bowed out of the race minutes before the vote. Dean told reporters on Friday that he did not think the party could "prosper" with a chair from inside the beltway and that if Perez or Ellison was elected they would "do the best we can."

Perez faces challenges moving forward. He must rebuild state organizations, which many in the party say have been deteriorating over the last eight years as resources and brain power became concentrated in Washington.

Democrats also defeated a resolution that would have banned corporate donations to the party -- a chance to reinstate an Obama policy that was nixed under former chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

Those in favor said the party needed to send a bold message to the grassroots and make a statement about "values." Those against said there was no point is proactively handicapping themselves when the "other side" had deep pockets.

Activists in the room booed and jeered when the resolution was defeated.

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Pete Marovich/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Top Democrats on Saturday chose former Secretary of Labor Tom Perez to lead the party in its opposition to the agenda of President Donald Trump.

The establishment and progressive wings of the party were split between Perez and Minnesota Rep. Keith Ellison over the last several months. Some progressives said they were reluctant to fall in line behind Perez should he win.

Perez has work to do: In addition to losing the 2016 presidential race, the Democrats have lost dozens of Congressional seats and hundreds of state legislature seats over the last several election cycles.

So who is Tom Perez? Here's everything you need to know:

Who Is Tom Perez?


Tom Perez served as secretary of labor for three years after being appointed by former President Barack Obama in 2013. Before that, he was labor secretary for the state of Maryland and was a civil rights attorney for the Department of Justice. He's also a graduate of Harvard Law School. Perez was born to Dominican immigrants in Buffalo, New York. He has never held elected office.

How Did He Get Elected?


A group of more than 400 top Democrats gathered on Saturday in Atlanta to cast their ballots to replace Interim Chair Donna Brazile. Perez fell one ballot short of a majority on the first round of voting. He defeated Ellison by a 235-200 vote in a second round.

Who Supported Perez for Chair (And Who Didn't?)


Perez lined up several high profile endorsements from former President Obama's orbit, including former Vice President Joe Biden, former Attorney General Eric Holder and former Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. But Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and Sen. Bernie Sanders backed Ellison and former chair Howard Dean backed South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg. Obama and former presidential nominee Hillary Clinton did not endorse anyone.

What Did Perez Do as Labor Secretary?


Perez's nomination for Secretary of Labor was divisive: He was confirmed 54-46 on a party-line vote after criticism from Republicans. Those in the Obama administration called him an effective leader and manager. He worked closely on minimum wage issues. But in order to toe the Obama White House line, he backed the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal. The decision put him at direct odds with several major unions across the country.

What Happens Next?

The question now is whether Perez can unite various factions of the party and bring grassroots organizers into the fold. Perez named Ellison deputy chair of the party immediately after the vote. Several leading progressive activists including chairs of the Women's March and founders of the People for Bernie organization remain skeptical of Perez. They lobbied hard for Ellison and framed the race as an outsider against an insider, creating the perception among many that by electing Perez over Ellison the party was missing a crucial opportunity reach out and include people who felt left out and on the fridges of the institution.

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Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic via Getty Images(NEW YORK) --  Former President Barack Obama surprised Broadway theater-goers Friday when he and daughter Malia attended the evening performance of The Price.

The daddy-daughter duo headed backstage after the play -- a new revival of the Arthur Miller classic -- and met with the cast, including Mark Ruffalo, Danny DeVito, Tony Shalhoub and Jessica Hecht.

The Roundabout Theatre Company tweeted a photo of the pair with the cast, writing, "We are so honored to have had President @barackobama in our theater this evening for #ThePriceBway!"

The president and Malia were spotted leaving the American Airlines Theatre through a stage door, and were greeted by catcalls and shouts of "there he is!" by passers-by.

In The Price, a police officer feels that life has passed him by while he took care of his late father. He and his estranged brother must reunite to sell off their father's possessions.

The Obama clan is no stranger no Broadway, having attended several shows during his presidency, including Hamilton, A Raisin in the Sun, Joe Turner's Come and Gone, Memphis, Kinky Boots, Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, Sister Act, The Trip to Bountiful, Motown the Musical and The Addams Family.

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Multiple news outlets were excluded from a White House gaggle with press secretary Sean Spicer on Friday afternoon, according to reporters present, sparking criticism from the White House Correspondents' Association and other observers.

The move comes amid President Donald Trump's ongoing battle with many news organizations, which he has characterized as "fake news" and the "enemy of the American People," an assertion which he doubled down on Friday during the Conservative Political Action Conference.

The gaggle, which took place in Spicer's office, was being held in lieu of a traditional briefing in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room, which seats 49 reporters but is often filled with others who line the sides and back of the room.

The outlets invited to join Spicer on Friday included the Washington Times, One America News Network and Breitbart News, as well as television networks including ABC, CBS, Fox News and NBC, Reuters, the Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, among others.

The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Politico and CNN were among the group excluded from the meeting. Upon learning of the restrictions, reporters from the Associated Press and Time boycotted the gaggle.

The session was recorded and ultimately distributed to the White House press pool, including those excluded.

ABC News' Cecilia Vega challenged Spicer about the move, questioning if the outlets were excluded because the White House did not like their coverage.

"Because we had a pool and then we expanded it," Spicer responded. "And we added some folks to come cover it."

Vega noted that there was space in the room for other outlets.

"I understand that there are way more than six that wanted to come in. We started with the pool and we expanded it," Spicer responded. "I think we've gone above and beyond when it comes to accessibility and openness and getting folks, our officials our team, and so respectfully I disagree with the premise of the question."

In a statement, the White House Correspondents' Association (WHCA) blasted the move.

"The WHCA board is protesting strongly against how [Friday's] gaggle is being handled by the White House," said Jeff Mason of the WHCA board. "We encourage the organizations that were allowed in to share the material with others in the press corps who were not. The board will be discussing this further with White House staff."

Earlier in the day during a speech at CPAC, Trump attacked the media for reporting what he labeled as "fake news," and said he wanted the press barred from using unnamed sources, in particular. This, despite his administration's use of background briefings and insistence upon the exclusion by the media of officials' names when reporting on the information from the briefings.

Trump did note, however, that he is a supporter of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.

"I love the First Amendment; nobody loves it better than me. Nobody," said Trump.

White Houses' taking on the press or specific outlets is not unprecedented.

The Obama administration battled with Fox News, excluding anchor Chris Wallace from a round of Sunday show interviews with Obama in 2009.

“We simply decided to stop abiding by the fiction, which is aided and abetted by the mainstream press, that Fox is a traditional news organization,” said Dan Pfeiffer, the deputy White House communications director, according to a New York Times report from the time.

Fox was also excluded from a network pool round robin interview with former pay czar Ken Feinberg on Oct. 22, 2009, but ultimately relented when other organizations boycotted.

According to a Mediaite report at the time, the Treasury Department denied that Fox was excluded.

And former President Richard Nixon was privately recorded in the Oval Office in 1972 saying "the press is the enemy," according to a Times report. The tapes were later released.

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ABC News(NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.) — President Trump made a victorious return to the Conservative Political Action Conference on Friday, where he sought to assure cheering audience members that they now have a top advocate for their policy priorities in the White House while also taking aim at his favorite target, the media.

"All of these years we've been together and now you finally have a president, finally," Trump said.

Trump was notably absent from the annual conservative gathering during his presidential run in 2016 and was skewered by his opponents in the GOP primary for skipping.

"I would have come last year but I was worried that I'd be at that time too controversial," Trump told the enthusiastic crowd Friday. "We wanted border security. We wanted very, very strong military. We wanted all of the things that we're going to get, and people considered that controversial, but you didn't consider it controversial."

'The dishonest media' and unnamed sources

Trump also doubled down on his attacks on the media, repeating his recent assertion that the "fake" news is the "enemy of the people," zeroing in on the use of unnamed sources.

"I'm against the people that make up stories and make up sources," Trump said. "They shouldn't be allowed to use sources unless they use somebody's name. Let their name be put out there."

The president's renewed criticism of the media comes as there are press reports that White House chief of staff Reince Priebus privately asked the FBI to knock down news stories of Trump campaign officials communicating with Russian intelligence agents. White House press secretary Sean Spicer said Friday morning that Priebus only asked FBI officials to go public with information that they had first privately provided to him which cast doubt on the media reports.

The president seemed at times in his address to want to qualify his attack on the press, saying he's not against all media.

"I want you all to know that we are fighting the fake news," said Trump. "It's fake, phony, fake."

Referring to a tweet he posted a week ago, which said the "fake news media… is the enemy of the American people," the president said that criticism was itself misrepresented by the press.

 

The FAKE NEWS media (failing @nytimes, @NBCNews, @ABC, @CBS, @CNN) is not my enemy, it is the enemy of the American People!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 17, 2017

 

"In covering my comments, the dishonest media did not explain that I called the fake news the enemy of the people. The fake news," said Trump. "They dropped off the word 'fake.' And all of a sudden, the story became, the media is the enemy. They take the word 'fake' out."

The president neglected to mention that his tweet named several mainstream media organizations.

Before he was president

Trump's speech marked his fifth time addressing the annual gathering of right-wing organizers and activists.

The conference hosted by the American Conservative Union began in 1974 and has since grown into a four-day-long event with thousands of attendees. Trump's appearance Friday marks the fourth visit by a sitting president.

Trump on Friday reminded the audience of what he called his "first major speech" at CPAC in 2011. That year, Trump floated the possibility of a run for the 2012 Republican nomination, a race ultimately won by former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

"America today is missing quality leadership and foreign countries have quickly realized this," said Trump in 2011.

"[The] theory of a very successful person running for office is rarely tested because most successful people don't want to be scrutinized or abused," he added. "This is the kind of person that the country needs and we need it now."

Six years later, Trump is the U.S. president and was the conference's main attraction.

Trump counselor Kellyanne Conway; his chief strategist, Steve Bannon; White House chief of staff Reince Priebus; and Vice President Mike Pence were a few of the major figures to speak at the conference on Thursday.

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- President Donald Trump used part of his speech at an annual gathering of conservatives Friday to take aim at reporters' use of anonymous sources, despite using unidentified sources himself in the past.

"They shouldn't be allowed to use sources unless they use somebody's name," Trump said in his speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference.

The president didn't mention that his White House like every previous administration has officials serve as unnamed sources frequently as a way of informing reporters of policy and operational matters. The media also uses anonymous sources to protect the identity of people who might fear retribution for sharing sensitive information.

Hours before the president spoke at the conservative conference, for instance, the White House invited reporters to a "background briefing" where it was insisted upon that the media not reveal the names of officials holding the information session.

There are also examples from before, during and after Trump's presidential campaign when he made claims without attributing his sources.

His birther claims

Over several years, Trump used unidentified sources to claim that former President Obama was not born in the United States, which if true would have made him unqualified to be president.

For example, Trump tweeted in August 2012: "An 'extremely credible source' has called my office and told me that @BarackObama's birth certificate is a fraud."

Not until September 2016, after Trump became the Republican nominee for president, did he publicly acknowledge that Obama was born in the U.S.

Unsupported claims during the campaign

Another example of Trump's making a claim without specific sources came in November 2015, when he asserted that he saw "thousands" of people in the United States cheering the attacks on Sept. 11 that brought down the World Trade Center.

During an interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos, Trump said he "watched in Jersey City, New Jersey, where thousands and thousands of people were cheering as that building was coming down. Thousands of people were cheering."

At a campaign event the day after the interview, he doubled down on that assertion.

"Lo and behold I start getting phone calls in my office by the hundreds, that they were there and they saw this take place on the internet," Trump said in Ohio.

ABC News checked a variety of footage from the time of the attacks and the weeks after, finding no basis for his claim.

Months later in May 2016, Trump repeated an unverified report from The National Enquirer -- which based its story on anonymous sources -- that the father of one of his GOP primary opponents, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, had been photographed with Lee Harvey Oswald before Oswald killed former President John F. Kennedy.

"I mean, what was he doing — what was he doing with Lee Harvey Oswald shortly before the death? Before the shooting?" Trump said during an interview with Fox News. "It's horrible."

The Cruz campaign immediately denied the claims made by The Enquirer and criticized Trump for his remarks.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) -- President Trump signed an executive order for regulatory reform on Friday, directing government agencies to set up task forces to look into ways to eliminate or scale back regulations.

Trump said that the order is “one of many ways” the administration will remove “job-killing regulations.”

"This directs each agency to establish a regulatory reform task force which will ensure that every agency has a ... real team of dedicated people to research all regulations that are unnecessary, burdensome and harmful to the economy and therefore harmful to the creation of jobs and business. Each task force will make recommendations to repeal or simplify existing regulations,” the president said.

Trump explained that any existing or proposed regulation will have to meet certain conditions.

"Every regulation should have to pass a simple test: Does it make life better or safer for American workers or consumers? If the answer is no, we will be getting rid of it and getting rid of it quickly. We'll stop punishing companies for doing business in the United States; it will be absolutely just the opposite,” he said. “They'll be incentivized to doing business in the United States. We're working hard to roll back the regulatory burden so that coal miners, factory workers, small business owners and so many others can grow their businesses and thrive.”

The new order is not the first by Trump aiming to reduce federal regulations.

In January, the president signed an executive order that he said will “dramatically reduce federal regulations” on businesses. That order mandates that for every new regulation implemented by federal agencies, two existing regulations must be cut.

Trump called that order the "largest ever cut, by far, in terms of regulations."

Last week, the president also rolled back the stream protection rule, a regulation designed to protect waterways from surface mining.

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RONALDO SCHEMIDT/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- Secretary of State Rex Tillerson has been maintaining his silence during his first weeks on the job, as has the department he heads. But some of that veil of silence will be lifting early next month.

The daily State Department briefing -- a fixture at Foggy Bottom since the Eisenhower administration and watched closely in Washington and in capitals around the world -- has not resumed under Tillerson. But "regular" briefings are set to resume on March 6, acting spokesperson Mark Toner said Friday, though it is unclear if they will still be daily or televised.

Tillerson concluded his second overseas trip Thursday night, this time with Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly, and he was only spotted in public three times -- getting off his plane Wednesday night, getting on his plane Thursday afternoon, and a three-and-a-half minute public statement that he read in between.

He was heard even less. In Mexico, as in Germany last week, he took no questions. And unlike Germany, there were no photo ops and no "pool sprays" -- opportunities for a small group of reporters or photographers to meet with an official. There wasn't even a read-out -- the official version of the discussion -- of his dinner with the Mexican foreign secretary Wednesday night, let alone of all his meetings Thursday.

Tillerson’s reticence on the trip comes after a wave of negative headlines asking where he is and if he’s being silent, sidelined, or is in over his head.

The bad press finally sparked something else the news media has not gotten a lot of lately -- an official State Department statement. It was a strongly worded comment that came Wednesday night and pushes back hard on those reports, sent on behalf of Toner, a career foreign service officer who assumed the role under President Obama and has so far stayed on for the Trump administration:

“The Department of State continues to provide members of the media a full suite of services. The Department has answered 174 questions from reporters in the United States and around the globe in the past 24 hours alone. The Secretary continues to travel with representatives of the media, the Department continues to provide readouts from the Secretary’s calls and meetings, the Department continues to release statements regarding world events and reporters continue to be briefed about upcoming trips and initiatives,” the statement said.

“In addition to regular press briefings conducted by a Department spokesperson, reporters will soon have access to additional opportunities each week to interact with State Department officials. The Department is also exploring the possibility of opening the briefing to reporters outside of Washington, DC via remote video capabilities," Toner's statement added.

Amid the reticence, here’s what we do know:

No briefing

As Toner’s Wednesday statement said, “regular” press briefings will be back “soon,” possibly with reporters Skyping in, like the White House briefing now has. Toner said Friday that those briefings will resume on March 6, but no word yet on whether they will still be televised or happen daily.

Three public statements

After more than three weeks on the job, Tillerson has made only three public statements: His address to the department on his first day; his 30-second prepared remarks after meeting the Russian foreign minister, and that statement he read Thursday in Mexico.

He has not taken any questions, and he has not granted any interviews. The most the press has heard from him was in response to shouted questions during a marathon day of meetings in Germany last week -- all one-sentence (or half-sentence) responses.

No readouts

It’s not just that Tillerson has been quiet; the State Department has been unusually silent, too.

It hasn't been providing readouts of the secretary’s calls to world leaders. Without them, the public doesn’t even know that they’re happening. Instead, America is now relying on the Russians or the Iraqis to say when they happen and what they discussed -- even on the most benign topics.

For example, the Russians said Tillerson called to express condolences after the death of their ambassador to the United Nations, and the Iraqis said he called to praise the Iraqi army’s performance in the fight against ISIS. All the State Department would tell the press is that the calls took place. Not even who called whom.

Many vacancies

Turnover between administrations is of course common, but a month after inauguration, multiple top roles at the State Department have yet to be filled -- from the secretary’s two deputies, to four out of the six undersecretaries, several assistant secretaries, and many key ambassadorships, including to major allies like Canada, France and Germany.

Conservatives have celebrated the “blood bath," but these positions help keep U.S. foreign policy running. And the lack of personnel has left many at the State Department stretched thin or feeling unsure about what’s to come, sources told ABC News.

Of the two undersecretary positions currently filled, one is also the acting deputy secretary and the other is in an “acting” capacity himself. And on Tillerson’s first trip abroad, five of eight senior officials were in acting roles.

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Stephen J. Cohen/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — Former Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear will deliver the Democratic response to President Trump's first address to a joint session of Congress on Tuesday,

Astrid Silva, an immigration activist from Nevada and one of the so-called "dreamers," will deliver the Democrats' Spanish-language response to Trump's speech.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi announced the speakers for the Democratic response Friday, indicating that Beshear was selected to counter GOP plans to repeal the Affordable Care Act and Silva to address the president's actions on immigration.

As a Democratic governor of a red state, Beshear embraced Obamacare and expanded Medicaid for his constituents.

“Governor Beshear’s work in Kentucky is proof positive that the Affordable Care Act works; reducing costs and expanding access for hundreds of thousands of Kentuckians,” Schumer said in a statement.

Silva came to the U.S. when she was 5. Her story as an unauthorized immigrant who was brought to the country as a child was mentioned by President Obama when he announced his executive action on immigration in 2014.

Silva also spoke at the 2016 Democratic National Convention.
 
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ABC News(WASHINGTON) — White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus made a personal appeal to a top FBI official to dispute reports that multiple senior members of President Trump's campaign had communicated with Russian agents during the 2016 election, a senior White House official confirmed to ABC News on Friday.

Priebus had reached out to FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe in an effort to knock down reports of talks between campaign officials and Russia following a New York Times report on the matter last week, the official said.

Priebus only made the request after the FBI had told the White House there were accuracy issues with the Times' report, the official said.

The New York Times reported earlier this month that U.S. intelligence found through intercepted calls and phone records that Trump campaign members and associates repeatedly had contact with Russian intelligence agents.

Priebus' intervention is drawing heavy scrutiny from Democrats who argue that the communications break with precedent that ensures the FBI remains independent from White House influence. A White House official would not comment on whether Priebus’ communication was appropriate.

The FBI has so far declined to comment on the story to ABC News.

Rep. John Conyers Jr., D-Mich., a ranking member on the House Judiciary Committee, argued that Priebus' actions should "concern all Americans, regardless of party."

"This is deeply troubling because of the inappropriate attempt to influence the FBI and because it may reveal a broader effort by the Trump White House to cover up malfeasance during the campaign," Conyers Jr. said.

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ABC News(NATIONAL HARBOR, Md.) — In his primetime speech to conservatives at the Conservative Political Action Conference Thursday night, Vice President Mike Pence spoke out against the backlash Republicans are seeing in districts across the country, dismissing the "best efforts of liberal activists," while promising an orderly transition from Obamacare to a GOP replacement.

"Despite the best efforts of liberal activists around the country, the American people know better," Pence told CPAC attendees at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Oxon Hill, Maryland.

Pledging an "orderly transition," he added, "America's Obamacare nightmare is about to end."

The vice president, appearing after President Trump's chief strategist Steve Bannon torched the media in a rare public appearance, also criticized the media and "elites" for missing Trump's victory.

"They're still trying to dismiss him," he said.

Pence also praised Trump's first month in office, calling his cabinet secretaries the "A-team" and praising Trump's nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court.

"You have elected a man for president who never quits, and never backs down. He is a fighter, he is a winner," he said.

Pence thanked the crowd for their support and urged them to remain active.

"Our fight didn't end on November the 8th ... the fight goes on," Pence said. "This, my friends, is our time."

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ABC News(NEW YORK) --  Democratic party officials will vote Saturday for a new chair of the Democratic National Committee, but heading into the weekend, the race is still neck-and-neck and hotly contested.

Democrats may be united against President Donald Trump, but they remain deeply divided about who is best to lead and represent them.

The crowded field of candidates vying for the job narrowed this week, but those who dropped out only solidified the fault lines in the race.

It remains to be seen whether the drawn-out campaign for this role will help the party as it looks to rebuild itself. Insiders, party staff and many voting members fear it may have hurt it. They feel they have been handicapped at the start of the new Trump administration. In conversations, they say they are anxious to have a leader in place and the organization fully operational again.

"The biggest issue I hear right now is they want to get this part over with and they want to start fighting, we are how many days into his administration already and we are still trying to decide who are leadership is," the party's current finance chair, Henry R. Muñoz, told ABC News. "Four years from now we should get this over at the end of the year."

Last weekend, New Hampshire Party chair Raymond Buckley bowed out and threw his support behind Minnesota congressman and Progressive Caucus chair Keith Ellison. Buckley praised Ellison’s commitment to investing in local parties, a promise all the candidates have made, as well as his impressive backing from large progressive organizations, including Democracy for America and the Progressive Change Campaign Committee.

 “Now, many candidates have spoken about these issues, but Keith's commitment to the states and a transparent and accountable DNC has stood out. He knows elections are not won and lost in the beltway, but on the ground across the country,” Buckley wrote in his statement. In a fundraising email a few days later for a progressive group, he wrote, that with Ellison as chair the “grassroots will be the top priority.”

Plenty of Democrats inside Washington and elsewhere fear Ellison lacks the management experience needed for the job and that picking him could send the wrong message to voters about the lessons the party needs to learn after the election in November.

Ellison is a firebrand, African-American Muslim who was one of the first to back Senator Bernie Sanders in the presidential primary. Sanders and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, in turn, immediately backed Ellison’s bid for chair. He is often asked if the party is moving too far to the left and he never hesitates to emphatically say it's not. He is quick to reject the idea that he only appeals to certain fractions of the party.

“My district is 63 percent white, mostly working class people," he told ABC News. "They elect me year after year and they know what my religion is and they can look at me and see what color I am. It's not a problem. People are only a demographic until you know them, then they become people. Whether you talk to white working class voters or you talk to people of color, women, they don’t feel that either one of them was talked to well enough.”

The other front-runner for the job is President Obama’s former Secretary of Labor, Tom Perez. Thursday, in a statement closely resembling Buckley’s, the state party chair from South Carolina, Jamie Harrison, exited the race and backed Perez, adding to the long list of party officials and members of Obama’s former cabinet who have lined up behind him.

 Perez argues that his experience running a large federal agency like the Department of Labor makes him uniquely qualified to oversee the national party. "Who has a track record of turning around organizations of that scale? That’s what we need to do," he told ABC News in a recent interview. "The Department of Labor is a big organization 16,000 strong and a 45 billion dollar budget and I had a good track record of making sure it was firing on all cylinders."

Like Buckley did for Ellison, Harrison praised Perez for promising to put grassroots activism front and center and strengthening state party chapters, but also emphasized Perez’s experience in Washington.

"Tom Perez has brought integrity, passion, and tenacity to every job he’s ever had," Harrison wrote. "These qualities are why Barack Obama and Joe Biden trusted him to spearhead an economic agenda that brought us out of the recession. They are why Eric Holder trusted him to enforce our civil rights and voting rights laws so that everyone is treated equally under the law and has access to the ballot box. And they are why I trust Tom to lead the Democratic turnaround as Chair of the DNC."

Neither Perez nor Ellison will confirm whether or not they have the majority of votes needed to win right now. Only 447 people will vote Saturday and most likely, the election will continue to be an iterative process with multiple rounds of ballots and debate, which could leave room for leader to emerge.

Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has received endorsements from five former DNC Chairs, including Howard Dean this week. Dean said Buttigieg, who turned 35 last month, brings a young perspective the party needs.

But Buttigieg -- an openly gay former Naval officer who served in Afghanistan -- entered the race relatively recently and lacks the national profile or name recognition like Ellison or Perez. Still, with his impressive resume, members have given him a look and he is quickly developing a following.

“Most important thing he is the 'outside of the beltway’ candidate,” Dean said this week of Buttigieg. "This party is in trouble. Our strongest age group that votes for us is under 35. And they don't consider themselves Democrats. They elected Barack Obama twice. They didn't elect Hillary Clinton but voted 58 percent for her and don't come out for the midterms or down ballot candidates."

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iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) --  Ivanka Trump hosted Republican members of Congress at the White House last week to discuss some of her personal legislative priorities -- a childcare tax proposal and paid maternity leave, according to a White House official and a Senate GOP aide.

News of the White House meeting was first reported by Bloomberg News.

It is unusual for the child of a president -- with no formal role in her father's administration -- to host a policy meeting with lawmakers inside the West Wing.

The White House official noted that Ivanka has been long been passionate about the issue and that it remains a priority.

 A spokesperson for Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Nebraska, said the senator attended the Wednesday evening meeting in the Roosevelt Room, where the group of GOP lawmakers discussed Trump's proposed childcare tax benefit and paid leave. Fischer introduced a paid leave bill earlier this month.

Ivanka has back-channeled with members of Congress on the issues she trumpeted during her father's campaign. This fall, she met with female Republican lawmakers at the RNC for a discussion on the same topic.

Members of the Trump transition team discussed the childcare tax proposal with staff on the tax-writing House Ways and Mean Committee in a phone call last month.

Ways and Means Committee chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, said his committee staff has had "productive" discussions with the Trump team about the proposal.

“We've had some preliminary and very productive discussions with the Trump transition team and their desire to make child care more affordable for families," he said to reporters recently. "So we’re exploring a number of options. They’ve brought some ideas forward, and it’s early in those discussions, but we’re having them."

Asked by ABC News' Cecilia Vega about Ivanka Trump's role in the administration following her participation in several White House meetings, White House press secretary Sean Spicer said the first daughter's role is "to provide input" on issues about which she has deep personal concern -- particularly as it relates to women.

"I think her role is to provide input on a variety of areas that she has deep compassion and concerns about especially women in the work force and empowering women," Spicer said. "She has as a lot of expertise and wants to offer that especially in the area of trying to help women, she understands that firsthand an I think because of the success she's had her goal is to try to figure out any understanding she has as a business woman, to help and empower women with the opportunity and success she's had."

On Thursday, Ivanka participated in several meetings at the White House with President Trump and top White House officials, as they met with business leaders. A day earlier, she met with minority business owners in the Baltimore area.

The president's eldest daughter also participated in a roundtable with female business leaders when Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visited the White House earlier this month.

In an exclusive interview with ABC News last month, Ivanka Trump dismissed speculation that she would take on some of the first lady's responsibilities in the White House.

“There is one first lady, and she’ll do remarkable things,” she told ABC News’ 20/20.

Trump has also walked away from her personal businesses, while in Washington.

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ABC News(WASHINGTON) --  Two days before the Trump administration approved an easement for the Dakota Access pipeline to cross a reservoir near the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe reservation, the U.S. Department of the Interior withdrew a legal opinion that concluded there was “ample legal justification” to deny it.

The withdrawal of the opinion was revealed in court documents filed this week by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the same agency that requested the review late last year.

“A pattern is emerging with [the Trump] administration,” said Jan Hasselman, an attorney representing the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. “They take good, thoughtful work and then just throw it in the trash and do whatever they want to do.”

The 35-page legal analysis of the pipeline’s potential environmental risks and its impact on treaty rights of the Standing Rock Sioux and other indigenous tribes was authored in December by then-Interior Department Solicitor Hilary C. Tompkins, an Obama appointee who was -- at the time -- the top lawyer in the department.

“The government-to-government relationship between the United States and the Tribes calls for enhanced engagement and sensitivity to the Tribes' concerns,” Tompkins wrote. “The Corps is accordingly justified should it choose to deny the proposed easement.”

 Tompkins’ opinion was dated Dec. 4, the same day the Obama administration announced that it was denying an easement for the controversial crossing and initiating an environmental impact statement that would explore alternative routes for the pipeline. Tompkins did not respond to a request by ABC News to discuss her analysis or the decision made to withdraw it.

On his second weekday in office, President Donald Trump signed a memorandum that directed the Army Corps of Engineers to “review and approve” the pipeline in an expedited manner, to "the extent permitted by law, and as warranted, and with such conditions as are necessary or appropriate." “I believe that construction and operation of lawfully permitted pipeline infrastructure serve the national interest,” Trump wrote in the memo.

Two weeks later, the Corps issued the easement to Dakota Access and the environmental review was canceled.

The company behind the pipeline project now estimates that oil could be flowing in the pipeline as early as March 6.

The analysis by Tompkins includes a detailed review of the tribes’ hunting, fishing and water rights to Lake Oahe, the federally controlled reservoir where the final stretch of the pipeline is currently being installed, and concludes that the Corps “must consider the possible impacts” of the pipeline on those reserved rights.

“The Tompkins memo is potentially dispositive in the legal case,” Hasselman said. "It shows that the Army Corps [under the Obama administration] made the right decision by putting the brakes on this project until the Tribe’s treaty rights, and the risk of oil spills, was fully evaluated."

Tompkins’ opinion was particularly critical of the Corps’ decision to reject another potential route for the pipeline that would have placed it just north of Bismarck, North Dakota, in part because of the pipeline’s proximity to municipal water supply wells.

“The Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservations are the permanent and irreplaceable homelands for the Tribes,” Tompkins wrote. “Their core identity and livelihood depend upon their relationship to the land and environment -- unlike a resident of Bismarck, who could simply relocate if the [Dakota Access] pipeline fouled the municipal water supply, Tribal members do not have the luxury of moving away from an environmental disaster without also leaving their ancestral territory.”

Kelcy Warren, the CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the project, has said that “concerns about the pipeline’s impact on local water supply are unfounded” and “multiple archaeological studies conducted with state historic preservation offices found no sacred items along the route.”

The decision to temporarily suspend Tompkins' legal opinion two days before the easement was approved was outlined in a Feb. 6 internal memorandum issued by K. Jack Haugrud, the acting secretary of the Department of the Interior. A spokeswoman for the department told ABC News today that the opinion was suspended so that it could be reviewed by the department.

The Standing Rock Sioux and Cheyenne River Sioux Tribes are continuing their legal challenges to the pipeline. A motion for a preliminary injunction will be heard on Monday in federal court in Washington, D.C.

The Corps has maintained, throughout the litigation, that it made a good faith effort to meaningfully consult with the tribes.

The tribes contend, however, that the Trump administration’s cancellation of the environmental review and its reversal of prior agency decisions are “baldly illegal.”

“Agencies can’t simply disregard their own findings, and ‘withdrawing’ the Tompkins memo doesn’t change that,” Hasselman said. “We have challenged the legality of the Trump administration reversal and we think we have a strong case.”

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