E-Club Members: Login Register

 

ABC - National News
Subscribe To This Feed

ABCNews.com(SPRINGDALE, Ark.) -- An escaped Arkansas inmate who had been on the run for 32 years was found and brought into custody on Sunday.

Steven Dishman escaped from the Cummins Unit Prison in Grady, Arkansas on May 28, 1985, according to the Arkansas Department of Corrections. He was discovered Sunday at a home in Springdale, Arkansas.

Dishman was convicted of burglary in 1984 in Washington County and was eligible for parole in 1987, a spokesman for the Arkansas Department of Corrections told ABC News. His discharge date was set for 1991.

The 60-year-old was taken into custody in Springdale by local law enforcement and Arkansas State Police.

Bill Sadler with the for Arkansas State Police told ABC News that an individual who had met Dishman about five years after his escape came forward over the past weekend. That information provided led the state troopers to the Springdale residence.

Dishman served one year of his seven year sentence before escaping. He will now have to serve the remaining six years of his prison term, Graves told ABC News.

Special agents of the Arkansas State Police Criminal Investigation Division have begun to question individuals who may have known Dishman but by a different name, according to Arkansas State Police.

It’s unclear at this point if Dishman will be serving more time for escaping.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(ANCHORAGE, Alaska) -- An Alaska man said he survived being pulled off of his bike and attacked by a large brown bear, thanks to his quick-thinking friend.

Alex Ippoliti said he and his friend James Fredrick were riding along a gravel road on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, a U.S. military facility in Anchorage, Alaska, on Saturday morning when they heard rustling coming from the woods nearby. Ippoliti said the two kept moving, but the bear went for Frederick.

The bear "came out of nowhere and pulled him off his bike," Ippoliti told ABC News.

Ippoliti, a member of the Air Force who was on base that day as part of a recreation program, said he knew he had to think fast in order to save his friend's life.

"When she dropped him, she turned toward me, and I was able to spray the bear," he said.

The bear scampered back into the undergrowth, and Ippoliti called 911. He then worked with Fredrick to stop his bleeding while they waited for help to arrive.

The pair had taken all the appropriate precautions while traveling along the road, Ippoliti said, and although he has biked in the area many times, he had never encountered a brown bear before.

"We had bear bells on, and there was a lot of visibility on the gravel road as we were coming down," Ippoliti said. "We didn't see the bear until she attacked. I had bear spray in a pack on my bike, and it was very easy to get it from there, fortunately."

After he sprayed the bear to get her away from Frederick, Ippoliti said they noticed a cub up in a tree. The pair walked down the road as quickly as possible away from the mother and her cub.

"There were a couple times I thought we should stop, but James kept telling me, 'We have to keep going,'" Ippoliti recalled.

Once they made it about 10 minutes down the road, approximately a quarter-mile from the encounter, he said they no longer heard the bear.

An environmental conservation officer who patrols the base for animal-related incidents was the first to meet them, and Fredrick was taken to Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage, where he was treated for his injuries. He is in stable condition and is expected to make a full recovery.

He later posted a photo with Ippoliti next to his hospital bed with the caption "This dude saved my life yesterday."

Ippoliti said he met Fredrick about a month ago through an amateur race team and their shared interest in riding on gravel trails.

Ippoliti said that after saving his friend, he hit the trails again the next day with his son. During a mountain bike race on Sunday, about 15 miles from the attack, he said his son and other riders encountered a black bear but no one was hurt.

"It's a perception lately that there seems to be more [bear attacks] than normal. Everyone is kind of on edge about it right now," Ippoliti said. "I still plan to go ride and do whatever I can to be smart about it and stay prepared so that I can be safe."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The family of Philando Castile, who was shot and killed by officer Jeronimo Yanez of the St. Anthony Police Department, has reached a $3 million settlement with the City of St. Anthony Village, Minnesota, according to a joint statement from both parties.

The settlement follows the acquittal of Yanez on June 16 of second-degree manslaughter and two counts of intentional discharge of a firearm that endangers safety.

Castile was killed on July 6, 2016, during a traffic stop, and his death, as well as the acquittal of Yanez, have drawn protests across the country.

The settlement over Castile's death is the second major settlement to be awarded to the victim of a police shooting in recent days.

The family of Michael Brown, a black teenager who was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, settled its lawsuit against Ferguson for $1.5 million on June 23.

The Castile settlement is nearly double the amount of what the Brown family received.

"Under the terms of the settlement, Valerie Castile, as Trustee, will receive a payment in the amount of $2.995 million," the statement says. "The settlement will be paid through the City’s coverage with the League of Minnesota Cities Insurance Trust."

The joint statement notes that no taxpayer money from the City of St. Anthony Village will be used to fund the settlement, and that the family intends to "deal with their loss through the important work of the Philando Castile Relief Foundation," a non-profit created to help victims of gun violence.

New dash cam video, which was released last week for the first time, reopened old wounds for those who were outraged by his shooting death nearly one year ago.

Yanez, who is Latino, initially encountered Castile, 32, while investigating a broken tail light on his vehicle.

Diamond Reynolds, Castile's girlfriend, was in the car with him at the time the shooting took place, along with her 4-year-old daughter.

Reynolds live-streamed the aftermath of the shooting on Facebook Live, helping to make it a national news story.

The dash cam video shows Yanez saying, "OK. Don't reach for it," referring to a firearm Castile had.

"Don't pull it out," Yanez says, repeatedly, as he appears to draw his own weapon.

He fires multiple rounds into the car, and Reynolds' voice can be heard screaming inside the car during the shooting.

The joint statement attempts to address the communal rift caused in the wake of Castile's shooting death, and says that the city is working to "rebuild trust" between the police and those they serve.

"The important work of healing our community continues. The City of St. Anthony Village reaffirms its commitment to transforming its police department in partnership with the United States Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services," the statement says. "Through the Collaborative Reform Initiative, the City and residents are working to improve trust between the police department and the communities it serves."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Sunflower Farm Creamery(CUMBERLAND, Maine) -- It's time for some cuteness overload.

Sunflower Farm Creamery in Cumberland, Maine, is known for posting really adorable photos and videos on its social media profiles.

One should expect nothing less from a place that boasts its hosting of "farm yoga."

So on June 21 when the farm introduced their new St. Bernard puppy -- Frances -- the online community braced for some adorable footage.

"She is resting up for her first farm yoga class and meeting the goats tomorrow morning," Sunflower Farm wrote on its Facebook page about Frances.

On Sunday, the farm posted the moment its social media audience had been waiting for: Frances meeting the Sunflower Farm goats.

Frances seemed to fit right in with the goats, as seen in the video, trotting alongside them and romping around with them in the barn.

Sure, there were faceoff moments, but all were playful in nature. At one point, the goats leapt from bag to bag of pine shavings as Frances chased them.

"The goats are very interested in figuring out what she is, and so far, Mildred, the 8-week-old goat kid, is most interested in befriending her," Sunflower Farm Creamery wrote on its YouTube page. "Mildred had a rough start and grew up inside for her first two weeks ... so it is no surprise that she is the least suspicious of the pup."

All during the video, Frances' tail can't stop wagging.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(DULUTH, Ga.) -- A teenage girl from Charlotte, North Carolina, has been found alive in Georgia after she went missing more than a year ago and a 31-year-old man is now in custody, according to the FBI.

The teenager had been missing since May 23, 2016, and was found this weekend at a home in Duluth, Georgia, more than 200 miles away from her hometown, the FBI said Sunday.

The FBI said its Atlanta-based agents worked with detectives from the Gwinnett County Police Department in Georgia to locate the girl after a special agent in Charlotte received information about the case.

Michael Ren Wysolovski, 31, was taken into custody in Georgia and is "facing a number of state charges," the FBI said. The Bureau added that additional charges could be forthcoming.

Wysolovski has been charged with sodomy/aggravated sodomy, false imprisonment, interference with custody and cruelty to children/deprivation, according to court records.

The teen, who authorities say has been reunited with her parents, had allegedly met Wysolovski online, her parents told ABC affiliate WSOC-TV in Charlotte.

The girl's parents said Wysolovski allegedly drove the teenager to his Georgia home. While in Georgia, the missing girl spoke to a woman online and told the woman she was missing; that woman allegedly contacted the teen's parents Friday night, which led to her rescue, her parents told WSOC.

Once authorities had received the tip about the girl's whereabouts, they acted quickly, her parents told WSOC.

“We got the first message at 8:09 (p.m.) and then by 12:32 (a.m.), they had her,” her mother told WSOC.

Wysolovski is expected to appear in court Monday afternoon, according to Atlanta ABC affiliate WSB-TV.

The FBI said its agents in Charlotte and the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department are continuing to investigate and will work with the FBI in Atlanta and the Gwinnett County Police Department.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- Two Marines were seriously burned Sunday night in a ground flash fire at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar in California that broke out while they were performing routine aircraft maintenance on a fighter jet.

"At approximately 10:18 P.M. (PST), a ground flash fire occurred on Marine Corps Air Station Miramar injuring two Marines from Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 112 (VMFA-112) who were performing routine aircraft maintenance on an F/A-18 at the time," said a statement from the Third Marine Air Wing based at Miramar.

"Both Marines are currently being treated for severe burns at the UC-San Diego Regional Burn Center," said the statement. "This incident is under investigation."

An earlier Marine statement had attributed the Marine injuries to an explosion that was later changed to a ground flash fire.

Flash fires can ignites suddenly from a combination of air and a flammable liquid or gas, usually around electrical equipment. These short-duration fires can be of high intensity and extremely dangerous.

VMFA-112 is a Marine Corps reserve unit based out of Fort Worth, Texas. This incident is under investigation.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(BOSTON) -- A Massachusetts man has been found guilty of second-degree murder for the killing of 2-year-old Bella Bond, who was nicknamed "Baby Doe" after her unidentified body washed up on a Boston area beach.

The defendant, Michael McCarthy, was dating the victim's mother, Rachelle Bond, at the time of the girl's death. Her body was found in June 2015.

McCarthy faces a mandatory sentence of life in prison with the possibility of parole in 15 years, the Boston Globe reported.

McCarthy's recorded interview with police was played in court, in which he denies killing Bella and says Bond put the blame on him.

Bond testified that on the night Bella died, McCarthy went to the 2-year-old’s room to tell Bella to lay down. Five minutes later she returned to the room, where she witnessed McCarthy punching Bella in the stomach, she continued.

"I saw her bounce off the bed" and then fall back down, Bond told the jury.

She said Bella's "head was swollen and gray” and she tried to do CPR.

She testified that she picked Bella up to leave but McCarthy grabbed her by the throat with both hands and said he'd kill her.

Bond told the court she blacked out. When she woke up, she was on the couch in the living room.

She testified that she told McCarthy he had killed Bella. McCarthy replied, "It was her time to die, she was a demon," Bond said.

That night McCarthy injected Bond with heroin in her neck, and later brought her to his car, she said on the stand. She said a green duffel bag was in the backseat and she thought Bella was in the bag. She said McCarthy hit her on the head, and when she regained consciousness, she did not recognize where she was, and McCarthy and the bag were not in the car with her. McCarthy later returned to the car, she said.

In June 2015 the girl's unidentified body, a zebra-print blanket and polka dot leggings were found on Deer Island, about eight miles east of Boston's Logan Airport.

Computer composites used to identify the body were viewed by millions and the mystery surrounding the unknown victim captivated the country.

In September 2015 Bella was finally identified, and McCarthy and Bond were arrested.

Bond, who was charged as an accessory, pleaded guilty earlier this year in exchange for her testimony against McCarthy, ABC affiliate WCVB-TV reported in February. She is currently incarcerated. After the trial, she will be released from jail and will serve probation for two years, according to the plea agreement.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Katrina Spry(NEW YORK) -- The calm after the storm also brought a little comedy in Midland, Michigan, when a man dressed as a Tyrannosaurus rex was spotted kayaking through flooded streets.

Over the weekend, homeowners began the onerous process of cleaning up after heavy rains caused flooding in several Michigan counties, ABC affiliate WJRT reported.

On Friday, Midland resident Travis Spry decided to bring a little levity to the situation, suiting up in a dinosaur costume and paddling into the flooded street outside his home. His wife captured the moment on her phone.

"We got lots of rain and flooding over the weekend and we needed some comic relief," his wife, Katrina Spry, told ABC News.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Crystal Nadareski/Facebook(QUEENSBURY, N.Y.) -- Stunning video published on social media shows the moment when a teenage girl dropped from a stopped ride at an upstate New York amusement park and fell into a crowd of park visitors and employees who had gathered below her to catch her.

The unidentified 14-year-old girl from Greenwood, Delaware, survived the ordeal and is at Albany Medical Center in stable condition with no serious injuries, according to The Warren County Sheriff’s Office.

"This is insane! We were just about to leave The Great Escape a Six Flags theme park, when I hear screams of a girl calling for help! People and security started to gasp and gather not knowing what to do. The ride continued to dangle her for 2-3 minutes before it stopped. Once it stopped she continued to hang for about 3-4 minutes screaming!," Facebook user Crystal Nadareski wrote in a post accompanying the video.

The accident happened on the “Sky Ride” at Six Flags Amusement Park, about 55 miles north of Albany, New York.

Six Flags released a statement saying that New York State's Department of Labor has cleared the ride for operation, but that no one can use it until an internal review of the incident has occurred.

"As the safety of our guests and team members is our top priority, and out of an abundance of caution, the ride will remain closed while we conduct a thorough internal review," the company wrote in a statement.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(COLUMBUS, Ohio) -- Several government websites in Ohio, including one for Gov. John Kasich, were hacked on Sunday displaying a pro-ISIS message, according to officials.

The message read, "You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries."

It ended with, "I love Islamic state."

Other websites that were affected by the hacking were those belonging to the Ohio First Lady Karen Kasich, the Office of Workforce Transformation, the Casino Control Commission, Medicaid, the Office of Health Transformation, the state Inspector General, the Office of Facilities and Construction Commission and LeanOhio, according to the Plain Dealer.

A group known as Team System Dz claimed responsibility for the hacking. According to ABC affiliate WEWS-TV, the Dayton City Paper, a free weekly arts publication, was hacked by the same group in 2015.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- The celebratory tone of gay pride marches from San Francisco to Istanbul on Sunday were undergirded by an atmosphere of political expression and protest.

Chelsea Manning, the transgender U.S. army soldier who was imprisoned for leaking classified military information about the Iraq war before being released through a pardon by outgoing president Barack Obama, celebrated her first New York City Pride March on Sunday in front of a float sponsored by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

Happy first Pride March, Chelsea Manning! #NYCPride2017 pic.twitter.com/nLfXV3KAKK

— ACLU National (@ACLU) June 25, 2017

As the same New York parade started, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced that artist Anthony Goicolea was chosen to design the first official monument to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people commissioned by the state of New York. Goicolea's design will take the form of "nine boulders, some bisected with glass that acts as a prism and can emit a subtle rainbow," according to a report in The New York Times.

In addition to appearances by performers like LeAnn Rimes, progressive organizations like The Democratic Socialists of America (DSA), a group that has seen a surge in membership since Trump's election, gave the event a more urgent tone. Marchers and revelers held signs that criticized capitalism, and highlighted the radical undertone of the 1969 Stonewall riots that helped to launch the modern day LBGTQ movement.

"Vulnerable communities are under attack right now, and they’re suffering systemic oppression, including transphobia, homophobia, and racism," Natalie James, who served as one of the organizers for DSA's contingent at the New York City Pride march, told ABC News by phone from the event. "We feel that socialism, as a political approach, is uniquely situated to addressing those issues."

Remember:
No pride for some of us,
Without liberation
For all of us!

✊🏿✊🏾✊🏽✊🏼✊🏻#SFPride #Intersectionality pic.twitter.com/LeP8ztfm8I

— Mia Tu Mutch Satya (@miatumutch) June 25, 2017

In downtown Minneapolis on Sunday, activists briefly disrupted a pride march by bringing attention to lingering anger over the death of Philando Castile, and the acquittal of Jeronimo Yanez, the officer who shot him, according to a report in the Star Tribune.

Protesters held signs that read "No KKKops, make pride revolutionary again!" and "No pride for some of us without liberation for all of us," the paper reports.

In the progressive hub of San Francisco, some marchers used pride to criticize the influence of corporations on the event, with one woman holding a sign that said, "COPS and CORPORATIONS OUT OF OUR PARADE."

Other signs at the march also focused on health care and President Trump's immigration policies.

A transgender female activist at the San Francisco rally held a sign that read: "NO PRIDE FOR SOME WITHOUT LIBERATION FOR ALL OF US."

Meanwhile, Turkish police attempted to stop activists for lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and intersex rights from gathering in large numbers for an LGBTQ pride event in Istanbul on Sunday, dispatching officers after a ban on the event was imposed.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(ALLENTOWN, Pa.) -- A man and a woman wanted for parole violation barricaded themselves inside a Pennsylvania home after allegedly firing shots at police, and later died in an apparent murder-suicide on Saturday.

The couple was being pursued after allegedly firing at police shortly before noon on Saturday. Following that incident, the man and woman fled and then barricaded themselves inside the attic of a home in Upper Saucon Township, according to authorities.

Police approached the home where they were hiding out and heard three gunshots that were not directed at them, according to Lehigh County District Attorney Jim Martin.

Officers dispatched a robot to investigate the area prior to finding the pair dead, Martin said.

While fleeing police, the man and woman approached at least two occupied homes, according to a report in local newspaper The Morning Call.

Edward Petro, a resident of the neighborhood where the couple fled, told the paper that he was sitting in his living room and flipping through TV channels when he saw strange shadows moving across the wall.

"I'm waiting for them to ring the doorbell, but the doorbell doesn't ring," Petro told the paper. "The guy comes in with a gun in his hand -- not in his waistband, in his hand. And I just stood in my tracks."

Petro told the paper that the man asked for his car keys, which he said he did not have. The encounter lasted only a few minutes.

The house where the man and woman eventually died was a few blocks from Petro's house, according to The Morning Call.

The names of the deceased have not been released yet by authorities, but police said they were wanted for violating parole.


Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Parker County Sheriff's Office(DALLAS) -- A mother whose two young children were killed after they were locked in a hot car in Weatherford, Texas, last month was arrested after she admitted she left them there to teach a "lesson," officials said.

The Parker County Sheriff's office said Cynthia Marie Randolph, 25, told investigators several different variations of what happened to her 16 month-old boy and 2-year-old girl on May 26. She was arrested following a final interview on Friday when she admitted she locked the car doors on her children around 12:15 p.m. after the 2-year-old daughter refused to get out, according to the sheriff's office.

Randolph said she wanted to teach her daughter a "lesson," and thought her daughter "could get herself and her brother out of the car when ready," officials said.

She told investigators she then went into the house to smoke marijuana and went to sleep for two to three hours. When she found the children unresponsive, Randolph originally said she broke a window of the vehicle to save them, but later admitted she did it to make it look like an accident, according to officials.

Both children were pronounced dead just after 4:30 p.m., when temperatures were approximately 96 degrees.

Randolph faces first-degree felony count of injury to a child causing serious bodily injury and was booked into the Parker County jail, according to ABC affiliate WFAA-TV.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

Annabelle Rose Photography(DESTIN, Fla.) -- A group beach photo is a staple of many summer vacations, but for one family it became a way to showcase the 17 amazing ways the clan has grown.

The photo, taken in Destin, Florida, in May, shows the 17 grandchildren of Mary Frances Fox lined up by age. Their T-shirts sport numbers depicting each wearer's place in the order -- with the oldest as 1 -- and are in colors signifying which of Fox's six children they belong to.

"Each one of my grandchildren is so proud to be a member of this big happy family that when their number was called, each one marched to their spot in the lineup," Fox, of Pensacola, Florida, told ABC News.

"We're so happy we could capture them all together which is no small feat," said Chrissy Roussel, who posted the photo to her Facebook page, Roussel Six Pack.

The idea to number the kids came from Roussel's sister Maryellen, and the photo was snapped by Katie Fox of Annabelle Rose Photography, who is Roussel's sister is law.

The picture is particularly poignant because of a special person who could not be there to see it: Frederick Michael Fox, Jr., the children's grandfather, Roussel said.

"My dad passed away three years ago. Later that same month, the last five babies were conceived," said Roussel, of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. "Babies 13 through 17, including my spontaneous triplets, numbers 13-15 are among them. We call those five babies the 'Frederick Five' in memory of my Dad. They've brought so much happiness and joy to our family when we needed it most. It is so bittersweet that he never got to meet them."

The children are:

Anna, 14

Grace, 12

Porter, 12

Julia, 9

Lucy, 9

Molly, 7

Cora, 5

Isla, 5

Emily, 5

Kate, 5

Sadie, 3

Aubrey, 3

Libby, 2

Abby, 2

Ruby, 2

Emmett, 2

Maren, 2

Fox said, "I imagine my husband as a big, jolly angel laughing down on all these little people."

Despite the bittersweet memory of their father and granddad, the photo has brought the family, and others, great happiness.

"I think so many people can relate to the joy that comes from being with your extended family and having all your little ones together," said Roussel. "Who doesn't want to play on the beach with their 16 cousins?! It just puts a smile on your face to see 17 smiling cousins lined up together on the beach."

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Subscribe To This Feed

iStock/Thinkstock(WORCESTER, Mass.) -- A suspect has been indicted for murder in the death of a 27-year-old woman who was killed last summer while jogging in broad daylight in Massachusetts.

Angelo Colon-Ortiz, 31, of Worcester, Massachusetts, was indicted Friday by a Worcester County grand jury in the murder of Vanessa Marcotte, according to Worcester County District Attorney Joseph Early Jr.

Colon-Ortiz, who will be arraigned in Worcester Superior Court at a later date, is being held by authorities on $10 million bail, Early said.

He was arrested two months ago in connection with Marcotte's slaying after his DNA matched samples found on her hands.

He was arraigned in Leominster District Court on April 18 after being charged with aggravated assault and battery, and assault with attempt to rape. At the time, Early said a murder charge was also expected to be added.

Marcotte disappeared after going for a jog on Aug. 7, 2016, near her mother's home in the town of Princeton, about 60 miles west of Boston.

Her body was found that night in a wooded area about a half-mile from her mother’s house.

An account manager at Google in New York City, Marcotte frequently visited family in Massachusetts and was planning to return to New York on the day of her death, according to Early.

A Google representative described Marcotte in a statement to ABC News as "a much-loved member of the Google team" who was "known for her ubiquitous smile, passion for volunteer work and love of Boston sports. We are deeply shocked and saddened, and our thoughts are with her family and friends."

Police have said she was likely attacked between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. local time. Investigators said previously that she may have struggled with her attacker, and that whoever killed her suffered scratches, scrapes and bruises during the struggle.

Police sources have told ABC News there were signs Marcotte was sexually assaulted and that there were burns on parts of her body.

Marcotte was murdered just five days after another female jogger was killed in the New York City borough of Queens. Police said Karina Vetrano, 30, was strangled to death on Aug. 2, 2016, while out for a jog along a path she often ran with her father.

Investigators in New York and Massachusetts do not believe the murders of the two young women are related, but authorities in both states have been working together to solve the mysteries surrounding their deaths.

Early has said they "haven't ruled anything out" regarding the similarities in the two cases.

Copyright © 2017, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.



Fox News
Local Weather
Calendar
Polls
What Do You Want This Weeks Hog Country Number 1 to be?
Add a Comment
(Fields are Optional)

Your email address is never published.

Kewanee Real Estate

 

Request Line:
309-853-4471